26. Summer 2019

LPR-Summer2019-CoverThe Summer 2019 issue of Little Patuxent Review launched on June 2, 2019 at Oliver’s Carriage House in Columbia, MD. Several authors were on hand to read their work, and videos of the readings are available on our YouTube page.

Take a look at the fantastic lineup of contributors below, and order your copy of the Summer 2019 issue. Annual subscriptions are also available online.

EDITOR’S NOTE

I remain in awe of the power of stories, essays, and poems. Across trends, movements, eras, and fads, I return to that sense of wonder and awe when reading literature. W.H. Auden called that feeling “encountering the sacred” and went on to say in his essay “Making, Knowing, and Judging” that this is part of our Primary Imagination. In a world so fractured we can’t even agree on what is factual, in an era of distracted attention, where information washes over us like water from a broken hydrant, I take comfort that my humanity hasn’t been so distorted that I can’t experience a sense of joy in the simple pleasure of reading something written well. Literature returns me to my humanity. This, I think, is part of our collective imagination, our primary magic, our initial prayer. I can “know thyself,” as the ancient Greek sages wrote, but I can also know others and the world around me.

The poems, essays, and stories in this issue of LPR aren’t mirrors reflecting the world; they are supernovas creating whole universes and black holes, pulling readers deeply, irrevocably in the realm of imagination. I can hear Gene Wilder tuning up in my memory: “There is no life I know that compares….” There is genuine genius in these pages, and I am grateful, endlessly, that such talented writers continue to trust LPR with their work. I feel a sense of pride and responsibility when I pass along that good fortune to our faithful readers. To both the contributors and the subscribers, I want to say thank you. Thank you for believing in awe and beauty and the power of writing to help us examine our lives. And thank you to the editors, contributing editors, and artists who provide us with such rich conversations about visual art, communities, and life. Every issue of LPR feels like every good cocktail party I’ve ever attended: smart discourse, well-dressed folks, space for the introverts to reflect, and, above all else, a care for one another.

I hope something between these pages grabs your attention. I hope that attention returns you to your own sense of wonder and awe. I hope we can all know ourselves a bit better. I hope that we can still recognize hope when we encounter something as sacred as good writing.

-Steven Leyva

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Poetry
WILLIAM EVANS Inheritance
MIRANDE BISSELL Pony Credo
ADAM TAVEL Autumn Scene in Perry County
LISA POFF Broken Heart Syndrome Is a Real Thing
MICHAEL MARK Fairy Tale for Two Sad Men
JENNY BINCKES LEE Nuns of My Order
ELAINE WILBURT After Going Down, From the Bottom Up
ELLERY BECK Jack Rabbit Trading Post
ALEJANDRO PÉREZ Sonnet for My Cousin Xiomara, Who Tried to Teach Me How to Dance Salsa
SUSAN JOHNSON What Knitters Do
TIM SEIBLES Come Home, Lady
TIM SEIBLES Harder and Harder Blues Villanelle
JALYNN HARRIS Phillis Wheatley Questions the Quarter
SARA BURNETT Cherchez la Femme
TOM LARGE October

Essay
MICHAEL SALCMAN Taha Heydari Paints a Picture—or the Archeology of Paint

Nonfiction
MANDY-SUZANNE WONG How Long Is a Wish-Walk Minute?
BENJAMIN INKS The Psychology of Concealed Carry
CHAD MACDONALD Them Banshees
SHELBY DENHOF Just Grains of Sand
PETER O’KEEFE Done from Memory

Fiction
MORGAN CHRISTIE The Panther
KAYLA KAVANAGH Unsaviors
KAROLINA WILK Gossamer
BARRY KITTERMAN By the Dry River
SHELLY STEWART CATO Rainbow Catchin’ Train Wreck

Art
TAHA HEYDARI

Interview
SUSAN THORNTON HOBBY An Interview with Tim Seibles