Meet Our Contributors: Q&A with Jeffrey Alfier

Jeffrey Alfier is a poet and photographer who resides in Southern California. His most recent poetry collection, The Shadow Field, was published by Louisiana Literature Journal & Press. Other books include Gone This Long – Southern Poems, The Wolf Yearling, The Red Stag at Carrbridge – Scotland Poems, and Idyll for a Vanishing River. Bleak Music, a photography-poetry collaboration with […]

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Meet Caitlin Wilson: Q&A with the 2022 winner of the Enoch Pratt Free Library Poetry Contest

The Enoch Pratt Free Library represents the free public library system of Baltimore. To learn more about the annual poetry contest, and to read Caitlin Wilson’s winning Poem, “Watershed”, click here. I caught up with Caitlin recently, who was kind enough to answer a few questions about her work. Our conversation follows. ~ LPR: I absolutely loved your poem […]

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Keeping it in the House: The art and necessity of exploring virtue and villainy in our writings about home.

Don’t miss Kiese Laymon’s Masterclass, KEEPING IT IN THE HOUSE: The art and necessity of exploring virtue and villainy in our writings about home. Laymon is the author of the genre-bending novel, Long Division and the essay collection, How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America. His bestselling memoir, Heavy: An American Memoir, won the 2019 Andrew Carnegie Medal for […]

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The Staggering Resilience of The 1619 Project

Little Patuxent Review and CityLit Project have teamed up to promote the CityLit Festival, which is taking place right now, both in-person and virtually! Nikole Hannah-Jones, creator of The 1619 Project and the keynote speaker at this year’s CityLit Festival, will be speaking this weekend in Baltimore! For more information about Nikole Hannah-Jones and the […]

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Concerning Craft: On Keeping a Broom

This month our guest essay is by former LPR contributor Erica Plouffe Lazure whose debut collection of stories, Proof of Me, goes on sale next month. Preorder her book here. *Woman Sweeping, Edouard Vuillard, 1899. ~ One of my Bennington writing teachers likes to say that even the best writers can’t expect to craft brilliant […]

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