My Two Heads

My first memory of a structured music environment comes from the fourth grade at Nativity, a Catholic school in Washington, D.C. The overexuberant nun insisted that we bend our thumbs at a ninety-degree angle, open our mouths, and stick the top of the crook between our lips so that they would form an oval. That […]

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On Being Invisible: Our Nation’s Veterans

This essay is part of a series inspired by our Winter 2012 Social Justice issue. The first one was posted September 2011, and all feature people who have helped make marginalized segments of our world more visible to mainstream America through poetry, prose and visual art. In the Sixties, nearly everyone I knew was–directly or indirectly–touched by the Vietnam War. Even my […]

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Meet the Neighbors: Enoch Pratt Free Library

A journal like Little Patuxent Review requires a vibrant literary and artistic community to thrive–and even survive. In appreciation of the cultural entities around us, we present “Meet the Neighbors,” where we provide you with some personal introductions. Recently, Little Patuxent Review partnered with Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, MD to put on a […]

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Writing Past Taboo: The Truth Thomas Poetry Workshop

In the Twenty-First Century, the rate of black unemployment is double that of whites in America, and a new Jim Crow exists where there are more black men in jail than were enslaved before the Civil War. Poems that address that pain are no less legitimate than poems about flowers. In the context of creative writing, everyone has something […]

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